Denver Police Department

Agencies deny reporters’ requests for body-cam footage of officer-involved shootings because there are no ‘complaints’ of misconduct

A Colorado law that went into effect in 2021 sets a timetable for the public release of law enforcement body-worn camera footage of incidents “in which there is a complaint of peace officer misconduct.” But if an officer shoots and kills someone, and no one formally complains, does the footage-release provision apply?


A year after the legislature passed a law on police radio encryption, Denver-area news outlets are still blocked from listening

But a year after House Bill 21-1250 was signed into law, reporters still can’t tune into Denver and Aurora police radio transmissions like they did before both agencies blocked public access — Denver in 2019 and Aurora three years earlier. Although each department has a written policy on radio access, neither has reached an agreement with any Denver metro news organizations.


Amendments to police bills address public access to internal affairs records, body-cam footage, Brady lists and news media access to encrypted radio traffic

One change will impact the release of body-worn and dashboard camera footage, and another might help mitigate the loss of public information caused by the encryption of police radio transmissions. Two additional provisions address public access to records of completed police internal affairs investigations and lists of officers who have credibility issues.



CFOIC, journalism groups decry law enforcement targeting of reporters and photographers during George Floyd protests

Journalists know they may find themselves in harm’s way when they cover volatile events such as the demonstrations we have seen in Denver over the past several days. But it is inexcusable – and a violation of the journalists’ constitutional rights – for law enforcement officers to single them out for attack simply for doing their jobs in chronicling these events.